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    • General & world history

      Y Diwygiad Mawr

      by Derec Llwyd Morgan

    • History of religion

      Representing Aztec Ritual

      Performance, Text, and Image in the Work of Sahagun

      by Eloise Quinones Keber

      Arriving in Mexico less than a decade after the Spanish conquest of 1521, the Franciscan missionary Bernardino de Sahagún not only laboured to supplant native religion with Christianity, he also gathered voluminous information on virtually every aspect of Aztec (Nahua) life in contact-period Mexico. His pioneering ethnographic work relied on interviews with Nahua elders and the assistance of a younger generation of bicultural, missionary-trained Nahuas. Sahagún's remarkably detailed descriptions of Aztec ceremonial life offer the most extensive account of a non-Western ritual system recorded before modern times. This book uses Sahagún's corpus as a starting point to focus on ritual performance, a key element in the functioning of the Aztec world. With topics ranging from the ritual use of sand and paper to the sacrifice of women, contributors explore how Aztec rites were represented in the images and texts of documents compiled under colonial rule and the implications of this European filter for our understanding of these ceremonies. Incorporating diverse disciplinary perspectives, contributors include Davíd Carrasco, Philip P. Arnold, Kay Read, H. B. Nicholson, Eduardo Matos Moctezuma, Guilhem Olivier, Doris Heyden, and Eloise Quiñones Keber.

    • History of religion

      God Creation History And Faith

      by Peter J A Heyden

      Since the end of the Second World War many archaeological finds have been made and much has been learned, particularly from the Dead Sea Scrolls and the Nag Hammadi texts. Many early documents have come to light, which were buried to avoid the destruction of all kinds of early religious beliefs and practices ordered by the 'orthodox' Church. As a result a host of scholars, archaeologists, theologians and fiction writers have since written hundreds of books on the subject matter, which had been hidden for nearly 1800 years. Over the past six years the author has read over two hundred books, pamphlets and pages from numerous websites. He read them all with interest, but more importantly with an open mind, whatever the persuasion of the writer and whatever angle or message they have been trying to convey. This book has been put together by amalgamating many of the thoughts, ideas and claims written in these books, interspersed with the author's own thoughts and ideas. The aim is to provide for the author an explanation of what may have happened historically, and how that has affected his own thinking. It is for his own satisfaction to try to gauge the course of the history of creation and religion through to the establishment of the early Christian Church, and of course in so doing studying other religions as well.

    • History of religion
      July 2009

      Double Agents

      Women and Clerical Culture in Anglo-Saxon England

      by Clare Lees (Author), Gillian Overing (Author),

      The book spans the entire Anglo-Saxon period from Aldhelm and Bede in the earliest centuries to Ælfric and the anonymous homilists and hagiographers of the later tenth and eleventh centuries; it draws on Anglo-Saxon vernacular texts as well as Latin ones, and on those works most familiar to literary scholars (such as the Exeter Book Riddles or Cædmon’s Hymn, the first so-called poem in English, or the female Lives of Saints) as well as historians (wills, charters, the cult of relics); and it deliberately reconsiders, from the perspective of gender and women’s agency, some of the key conceptual issues that studying Anglo-Saxon England presents (the relation of orality to literacy; that of poetry and sanctity to belief; the cultural significance of names, naming, and metaphors in Anglo-Saxon writing).

    • History of religion
      October 2009

      Spirituality in Ministerial Formation

      The Dynamic of Prayer in Learning

      by Andrew Mayes (Author)

      This is a ground-breaking study into a crucial area of theological education. It traces the origin and evolution of the formation model of training and identifies what difference this paradigm makes to present practice. It uncovers significant and surprising functions of prayer in the formational and learning process as discovered in empirical research (informed by theological and psychological perspectives on prayer) among a sample of newly ordained clergy and tutors. The practical implications of the research are identified, offering creative ideas for a renewed understanding and praxis of the role of prayer in learning. This is essential reading for theological students and teachers alike, and calls for a clearer articulation of a spirituality of education as needed by our present culture and context.

    • History

      History of Israel

      by Christian Frevel

      This transcript illustrates the „history of Israel“ from the beginnings until the Bar-Kochba insurgence 132-135 AD. The knowledge, which is indispensable for exegesis and theology studies, is passed on by the author as a matter of course and in light of current research. He uses all available sources for his illustrations: next to the bible, archaeological findings, inscriptions and artwork have been considered; it is shown by means of example how the sources are to be interpreted and where the boundaries of reconstructing history lie. For this purposes, he introduces the latest findings of archaeological and historic research and links the results to biblical interpretations in a critical manner. This produces an impression of the history of ancient Israel in the context of the Southern Levant, which is often familiar, but also fresh and unexpected.

    • History
      November 2015

      Indispensable immigrants

      The wine porters of northern Italy and their saint, 1200–1800

      by Lester Little

      Indispensable immigrants recreates the world of peasants who streamed into the cities of late medieval and early modern northern Italy to carry crushingly heavy containers of wine. Written in an easily accessible and unassuming style, it is solidly grounded in previously untapped archival and visual sources. In this first-ever reconstruction of the forgotten metier of wine porter, topography plays a key role in forming the labour market; in the scramble to distinguish professionals from manual labourers the term artist gets divorced from lowly artisan, and wretched diet is invoked to explain why workers are so unintelligent; the wine porters make one of their own their patron saint in thirteenth-century Cremona and other interest groups scheme successfully to get him canonised in Rome five centuries later; and when enlightened despots abolish the guilds, the wine porters' trade fades away just as the candles on their patron's altars sputter and die out.

    • History
      November 2015

      Indispensable immigrants

      The wine porters of northern Italy and their saint, 1200–1800

      by Lester Little

      Indispensable immigrants recreates the world of peasants who streamed into the cities of late medieval and early modern northern Italy to carry crushingly heavy containers of wine. Written in an easily accessible and unassuming style, it is solidly grounded in previously untapped archival and visual sources. In this first-ever reconstruction of the forgotten metier of wine porter, topography plays a key role in forming the labour market; in the scramble to distinguish professionals from manual labourers the term artist gets divorced from lowly artisan, and wretched diet is invoked to explain why workers are so unintelligent; the wine porters make one of their own their patron saint in thirteenth-century Cremona and other interest groups scheme successfully to get him canonised in Rome five centuries later; and when enlightened despots abolish the guilds, the wine porters' trade fades away just as the candles on their patron's altars sputter and die out.

    • History of religion
      November 2015

      Faith in the family

      A lived religious history of English Catholicism, 1945–82

      by Alana Harris

      Drawing upon a multi-disciplinary methodology employing diverse written sources, material practices and vivid life histories, Faith in the family seeks to assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council on the ordinary believer, alongside contemporaneous shifts in British society relating to social mobility, the sixties, sexual morality and secularisation. Chapters examine the changes in the Roman Catholic liturgy and Christology; devotion to Mary, the rosary and the place of women in the family and church, as well as the enduring (but shifting) popularity of Saints Bernadette and Thérèse. Appealing to students of modern British gender and cultural history, as well as a general readership interested in religious life in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century, Faith in the family illustrates that despite unmistakable differences in their cultural accoutrements and interpretations of Catholicism, English Catholics continued to identify with and practise the 'Faith of Our Fathers' before and after Vatican II.

    • History of religion
      November 2015

      Faith in the family

      A lived religious history of English Catholicism, 1945–82

      by Alana Harris

      Drawing upon a multi-disciplinary methodology employing diverse written sources, material practices and vivid life histories, Faith in the family seeks to assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council on the ordinary believer, alongside contemporaneous shifts in British society relating to social mobility, the sixties, sexual morality and secularisation. Chapters examine the changes in the Roman Catholic liturgy and Christology; devotion to Mary, the rosary and the place of women in the family and church, as well as the enduring (but shifting) popularity of Saints Bernadette and Thérèse. Appealing to students of modern British gender and cultural history, as well as a general readership interested in religious life in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century, Faith in the family illustrates that despite unmistakable differences in their cultural accoutrements and interpretations of Catholicism, English Catholics continued to identify with and practise the 'Faith of Our Fathers' before and after Vatican II.

    • Early modern history: c 1450/1500 to c 1700
      July 2013

      Black Bartholomew's Day

      Preaching, polemic and Restoration nonconformity

      by David J. Appleby

      Black Bartholomew's Day explores the religious, political and cultural implications of a collision of highly-charged polemic prompted by the mass ejection of Puritan ministers from the Church of England in 1662. It is the first in-depth study of this heated exchange, centres centring on the departing ministers' farewell sermons. Many of these valedictions, delivered by hundreds of dissenting preachers in the weeks before Bartholomew's Day, would be illegally printed and widely distributed, provoking a furious response from government officials, magistrates and bishops. Black Bartholomew's Day re-interprets the political significance of ostensibly moderate Puritan clergy, arguing that their preaching posed a credible threat to the restored political order This book is aimed at readers interested in historicism, religion, nonconformity, print culture and the political potential of preaching in Restoration England.

    • History of religion
      February 2013

      Creating a Scottish church

      Catholicism, gender and ethnicity in nineteenth-century Scotland

      by S. Karly Kehoe

      This book highlights how the Catholic population participated in the extension of citizenship in Scotland and considers Catholicism's transition from an underground and isolated church to a multi-faceted institution by taking a critical look at gender, ethnicity and class. It prioritises the role of women in the transformation and modernization of Catholic culture and represents a radical departure from the traditional perception of the church as an institution on the fringes of Scotland's religious and civic landscape. It examines how Catholicism participated in constructions of national identity and civic society. Industrialisation, urbanisation, and Irish migration forced Catholics and non-Catholics to reappraise Catholicism's position in Scotland and in turn Scotland's position in England. Using previously unseen archival material from private church and convent collections, it reveals how the construction of a Catholic social welfare system and associational culture helped to secure a civil society and national identity that was distinctively Scottish.

    • History of religion
      May 2013

      Death, life, and religious change in Scottish towns c. 1350–1560

      by Mairi Cowan

      Death, life, and religious change in Scottish towns c. 1350-1560 examines lay religious culture in Scottish towns between the Black Death and the Protestant Reformation. It looks at what the living did to influence the dead and how the dead were believed to influence the living in turn; it explores the ways in which townspeople asserted their individual desires in the midst of overlapping communities; and it considers both continuities and changes, highlighting the Catholic Reform movement that reached Scottish towns before the Protestant Reformation took hold. Students and scholars of Scottish history and of medieval and early modern history more broadly will find in this book a new approach to the religious culture of Scottish towns between 1350 and 1560, one that interprets the evidence in the context of a time when Europe experienced first a flourishing of medieval religious devotion and then the sterner discipline of early modern Reform.

    • History of religion
      May 2014

      Faith in the family

      A lived religious history of English Catholicism, 1945–82

      by Alana Harris

      Drawing upon a multi-disciplinary methodology employing diverse written sources, material practices and vivid life histories, Faith in the family seeks to assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council on the ordinary believer, alongside contemporaneous shifts in British society relating to social mobility, the sixties, sexual morality and secularisation. Chapters examine the changes in the Roman Catholic liturgy and Christology; devotion to Mary, the rosary and the place of women in the family and church, as well as the enduring (but shifting) popularity of Saints Bernadette and Thérèse. Appealing to students of modern British gender and cultural history, as well as a general readership interested in religious life in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century, Faith in the family illustrates that despite unmistakable differences in their cultural accoutrements and interpretations of Catholicism, English Catholics continued to identify with and practise the 'Faith of Our Fathers' before and after Vatican II.

    • History of religion
      July 2013

      George Fox and Early Quaker Culture

      by Hilary Hinds

      What was distinctive about the founding principles and practices of Quakerism? In George Fox and Early Quaker Culture, Hilary Hinds explores how the Light Within became the organizing principle of this seventeenth-century movement, inaugurating an influential dissolution of the boundary between the human and the divine. Taking an original perspective on this most enduring of radical religious groups, Hinds combines literary and historical approaches to produce a fresh study of Quaker cultural practice. Close readings of Fox's Journal are put in dialogue with the voices of other early Friends and their critics to argue that the Light Within set the terms for the unique Quaker mode of embodying spirituality and inhabiting the world. In this important study of the cultural consequences of a bedrock belief, Hinds shows how the Quaker spiritual self was premised on a profound continuity between sinful subjects and godly omnipotence. This study will be of interest not only to scholars and students of seventeenth-century literature and history, but also to those concerned with the Quaker movement, spirituality and the changing meanings of religious practice in the early modern period.

    • History of religion
      July 2013

      George Fox and Early Quaker Culture

      by Hilary Hinds

      What was distinctive about the founding principles and practices of Quakerism? In George Fox and Early Quaker Culture, Hilary Hinds explores how the Light Within became the organizing principle of this seventeenth-century movement, inaugurating an influential dissolution of the boundary between the human and the divine. Taking an original perspective on this most enduring of radical religious groups, Hinds combines literary and historical approaches to produce a fresh study of Quaker cultural practice. Close readings of Fox's Journal are put in dialogue with the voices of other early Friends and their critics to argue that the Light Within set the terms for the unique Quaker mode of embodying spirituality and inhabiting the world. In this important study of the cultural consequences of a bedrock belief, Hinds shows how the Quaker spiritual self was premised on a profound continuity between sinful subjects and godly omnipotence. This study will be of interest not only to scholars and students of seventeenth-century literature and history, but also to those concerned with the Quaker movement, spirituality and the changing meanings of religious practice in the early modern period.

    • History of religion
      July 2012

      George Fox and Early Quaker Culture

      by Hilary Hinds

      What was distinctive about the founding principles and practices of Quakerism? In George Fox and Early Quaker Culture, Hilary Hinds explores how the Light Within became the organizing principle of this seventeenth-century movement, inaugurating an influential dissolution of the boundary between the human and the divine. Taking an original perspective on this most enduring of radical religious groups, Hinds combines literary and historical approaches to produce a fresh study of Quaker cultural practice. Close readings of Fox's Journal are put in dialogue with the voices of other early Friends and their critics to argue that the Light Within set the terms for the unique Quaker mode of embodying spirituality and inhabiting the world. In this important study of the cultural consequences of a bedrock belief, Hinds shows how the Quaker spiritual self was premised on a profound continuity between sinful subjects and godly omnipotence. This study will be of interest not only to scholars and students of seventeenth-century literature and history, but also to those concerned with the Quaker movement, spirituality and the changing meanings of religious practice in the early modern period.

    • Social & cultural history
      May 2013

      Infidel feminism

      Secularism, religion and women's emancipation, England 1830–1914

      by Laura Schwartz

      Infidel feminism is the first in-depth study of a distinctive brand of women's rights that emerged out of the Victorian Secularist movement. It looks at the lives and work of a number of female activists, whose renunciation of religion shaped their struggle for emancipation. Anti-religious or secular ideas were fundamental to the development of feminist thought, but have, until now, been almost entirely passed over in the historiography of the Victorian and Edwardian women's movement. In uncovering an important tradition of Freethinking feminism, this book reveals an ongoing radical and free love current connecting Owenite feminism with the more 'respectable' post-1850 women's movement and the 'New Women' of the early twentieth century. This book will be invaluable to both scholars and students of social and cultural history and feminist thought, and to interdisciplinary studies of religion and secularisation, as well as those interested in the history of women's movements more broadly.

    • History of religion
      July 2016

      Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain

      by Edited by Gareth Atkins

      This book examines the place of 'saints' and sanctity in a self-consciously modern age, and argues that Protestants were as fascinated by such figures as Catholics were. Long after the mechanisms of canonisation had disappeared, people continued not only to engage with the saints of the past but continued to make their own saints in all but name. Just as strikingly, it claims that devotional practices and language were not the property of orthodox Christians alone. Making and remaking saints in the nineteenth-century Britain explores for the first time how sainthood remained significant in this period both as an enduring institution and as a metaphor that could be transposed into unexpected contexts. Each of the chapters in this volume focuses on the reception of a particular individual or group, and together they will appeal to not only historians of religion, but those concerned with material culture, the cult of history, and with the reshaping of British identities in an age of faith and doubt.

    • Humanities & Social Sciences
      August 2016

      Faith in the family

      A lived religious history of English Catholicism, 1945–82

      by Alana Harris

      Drawing upon a multi-disciplinary methodology employing diverse written sources, material practices and vivid life histories, Faith in the family seeks to assess the impact of the Second Vatican Council on the ordinary believer, alongside contemporaneous shifts in British society relating to social mobility, the sixties, sexual morality and secularisation. Chapters examine the changes in the Roman Catholic liturgy and Christology; devotion to Mary, the rosary and the place of women in the family and church, as well as the enduring (but shifting) popularity of Saints Bernadette and Thérèse. Appealing to students of modern British gender and cultural history, as well as a general readership interested in religious life in Britain in the second half of the twentieth century, Faith in the family illustrates that despite unmistakable differences in their cultural accoutrements and interpretations of Catholicism, English Catholics continued to identify with and practise the 'Faith of Our Fathers' before and after Vatican II. ;

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